Meet Jeremy Goldstein – A Partner at Jeremy L. Goldstein & Associates

Jeremy Goldstein is among the members of Jeremy L. Goldstein & Associates which is an executive law firm that is devoted towards advising management teams, Chief Executive Officers, business and compensation committees in corporate governance in conjunction with executive compensation matters and especially the various issues that arise in a transformative business event concept and other sensitive issues.

Jeremy Goldstein serves in the sub-committee of the American Bar Association Business Section as the chairman of Mergers and Acquisitions. He has worked with many of the large corporate deals in the past ten years. He also stands as one of the top executive compensation lawyers in the United States of America.

He pursued his career in law at the New York University where he attained a J.D. He is also a holder of a B.A. that he earned at Cornel University. He also has an M.A. which he earned at the University of Chicago. Read more: Jeremy Goldstein | Chambers and Partners and Exclusive NYC Wine Dinners Hosted by Attorney Jeremy Goldstein and Friends over 56000 for Fountain House

Jeremy Goldstein has been hosted for many interviews to share about his personal life and his incredible success in his career. In most of the interviews, he is usually asked to explain where he got the idea for JLG Associates.

In response, Goldstein said that there was much talk in governance circles regarding conflicts about interest in executive compensation issues around ten years ago. With the dramatic rise of this issue, they witnessed most of the executive compensation consulting law firms break off from large organizations.

This was an eye-opener and made him develop a feeling that there might be more room in the market for a law firm to handle similar cases.

This triggered his mind, and after thorough evaluation, he decided to establish his law firm and this how the idea JLG came to being.

Jeremy Goldstein usually comes across the question on what he does to make sure that his workday is successful and productive.

He starts by stating that he always advises his clients on their pay based on their careers. He noted that there are various issues near and dear to their hearts (tastes and preferences).

Among the majors question that strikes their hearts as if they should take the job offer or not, the effects of the job to their lives, and above all their family matters a lot. Learn more about Jeremiah Goldstein: https://www.slideshare.net/JeremyGoldstein14/ and https://www.visualcv.com/jeremygoldstein

He noted that there are barely any shortcuts in the type of work that he does. He pointed out the work involves advising, drafting and negotiating.

He added that its time consuming but successful practitioners need to have a specific bedside manner that requires 24 hrs. Available and full dedication.

Jeremy Goldstein Says EPS Is Good For Both Employees and Employers

The question of whether EPS (Earnings Per Share) is good or bad needs to be settled if owners of corporations want their companies to continue existing. Ignoring the answer to this important question will jeopardize their company’s ability to make profit and thus endanger their existence. Thankfully, Jeremy Goldstein has an answer to the question and has a solution to the problem that will satisfy both parties in the equation. His extensive experience in settling disputes of companies versus their employees will have a bearing on whether EPS is good or bad for a corporation.

 

 

Advocates of EPS claim that it is beneficial not only to the employees but also to their employers. Meanwhile, EPS detractors say that it will be disastrous to a company and to a larger extent, to the nation’s economy. Goldstein, who is a principal in Jeremy L. Goldstein and Associates, LLC proposes a compromise between the two sides. In the absence of another option, both parties should hear what Goldstein has to say.

 

 

EPS is basically a way to gauge the profitability of a corporation. It is a figure that can be calculated using the formula: EPS = (Net Income – Preferred Stock Dividends)/Average Outstanding Shares. As such, the company’s profit is broken down by its particular EPS on a per share basis. In other words, EPS is a way to show a company’s value.

 

 

The opponents of EPS say that there is a dark side to this system. They claim that because of the very competitive nature of trading and shares, company owners and corporations could use EPS to their advantage. If they use EPS with wrong motives, they could create a financial picture that shows the results they want, no matter what the actual financial situation is. They can do this to boost their income or sales. EPS, according to its detractors, could also endanger favoritism among the ranks of employees in a company.

 

 

Meanwhile, proponents of EPS are enthusiastic about its supposed benefits. They say EPS will encourage employers to increase the salaries of their workers. Furthermore, they say that it will encourage stakeholders of the company to sell or buy their shares. If only these two factors are considered, EPS could really be considered as beneficial to both employee and employer. Learn more: http://officialjeremygoldstein.com/philanthropy/

 

 

It is therefore obvious that these two sides will be in conflict with each other over the EPS issue. In this scenario, Goldstein is proposing a compromise. He suggests that instead of removing EPS, a company should make its owners and top executives more accountable to their actions. If the top management echelon will be more responsible with their decisions, there is no need to deprive employees with their deserved pay hikes. The employees will be happy to do their jobs and the company’s production will increase and so will its income and profit.